Category: Reviews

New book independent book review by Kirkus

This fourth installment of a nonfiction series explores the intersection between the physical and spiritual worlds.

In this volume, Murphy expounds on his “two-world hypothesis” with an emphasis on physical and spiritual health. Featuring an underlying assumption that humans are “dualistic” beings with both physical and spiritual bodies, the author’s thesis argues that there are likewise two worlds—a finite “physical world” and an infinite “ethereal world”—that “act upon each other.” While accepting that modern medicine can cure physical problems, the book claims that many of humanity’s ailments (particularly mental health ones) are really “of spiritual origin” and thus require spiritual treatments. Divided into two parts, the volume looks at specific spiritual causes of human suffering in the first section. These spiritual ailments range from “past-life traumas” that can physically manifest in the birthmarks of reincarnated babies to possession by “evil spirits” or “demons.” Indeed, the book contends that possession by an evil spirit is more than just the stereotypical psychosis associated with images conjured by movies like The Exorcistand include benign symptoms, such as forgetfulness and indecisiveness. After offering a “primer” on spiritual conditions, the volume’s second half delivers strategies, such as meditation techniques and child-rearing tips, that can address and provide relief for those who suffer. Written in a concise style whose main body is under 100 pages, this book does not make a comprehensive case for the existence of the supernatural. Rather than analyzing otherworldly beings through the lens of scientific data, the volume often simply assumes that the entities, from gnomes (who are “very loyal, if you can convince them to help”) to ghosts (“the spirits of materialistic people who have no thoughts of the afterlife”), are part of the two-world universe in which humans exist. And while Christian readers may dismiss some of its topics as occultic, the engrossing work leans heavily into Christian theology, with ample biblical references and appendix material centered on squaring its ideas within that religion’s traditions. Some physicians and psychologists may dismiss the unconventional book as pseudo-scientific while acknowledging the value of its arguments supporting meditation and empathy.

An engaging, if unorthodox, approach to health.

New Review from https://www.kirkusreviews.com

New review of Torn Between Two Worlds – Material and Ethereal

In summation,  this book covers many controversial viewpoints but backs them up in a logical fashion.  The end of the book suggests several resources to understand better the foundations for Murphy’s theses.  Mark Twain’s thoughts on Joan of Arc, who took command of the King’s army at seventeen, are particularly enlightening.  Walther Hinz’s work is intriguing as well. Overall, I rate the book and its theories and supporting references a fascinating read at the very least. Murphy has put his work in and should be commended for the amount of research and supporting documentation he provides in this book with his research and supporting documentation.

 

 

Torn Between Two Worlds – Editorial Review

While this book does not claim to have all the answers, it effectively points readers toward a direction where they might be able to ask the right questions. Packed with facts, logic, and compelling anecdotes, this is a body of work that will start conversations and generate discussions among those who read it. Its unbiased exploration of the relationship between that which is known and unknown will ensure that it is appreciated by both scientists and philosophers alike, and even more so by those who share the author’s belief that one simply cannot exist without the other.

via Torn Between Two Worlds – Editorial Review